Skip to content

Tell us what you think about Pacific Languages in Aotearoa

Tell us what you think about Pacific Languages in Aotearoa

Leo Moana o Aotearoa – the Pacific Languages of Aotearoa Survey – is the first of its kind, investigating the use of and attitudes to Pacific languages in Aotearoa. 

Since the last comprehensive survey of Pacific languages in Aotearoa, Pacific language use in Aotearoa has declined and, in some cases, significantly. This survey is designed with the intention to contribute to policy development toward the revitalisation, maintenance, and sustainability of Pacific languages in Aotearoa.

Whether you are a young person, a parent, a teacher or a community leader or just someone with a passion for supporting Pacific languages to thrive – we welcome your feedback. We also welcome feedback from community organisations, businesses, Churches and any groups that serve Pacific communities.

This survey will take around 15-20 minutes to complete.

You can do the survey here

This project has received ethics approval from the New Zealand Ethics Committee: NZEC21_26.

Frequently asked questions

The Leo Moana o Aotearoa – Pacific Languages of Aotearoa Project is the first national project of its kind to investigate the use and attitudes towards nine Pacific languages in Aotearoa -Te Gagana Tokelau, Vagahau Niue, Te Reo Māori Kuki ‘Āirani, Gagana Samoa, Lea faka-Tonga , Te Gana Tuvalu, Vosa Vakaviti, Fäeag Rotųam and Te taetae ni Kiribati 

The objectives of this research are to:

  • investigate the use of, and attitudes to, Pacific languages in Aotearoa –to contribute to the revitalisation, maintenance, and sustainability of these languages in Aotearoa.
  • deepen our understanding of the current state of Pacific languages in Aotearoa.

The research project involves both a national survey as well as talanoa with Pacific communities from nine Pacific groups across Aotearoa (Tokelau, Niue, Cook Islands, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Fiji, Rotuma, and Kiribati) to gain an in-depth understanding of the use and valuing of Pacific languages by Pacific people in Aotearoa.

The results will:

  • provide baseline data and a better understanding of the current state of Pacific languages in Aotearoa.
  • provide qualitative data to underpin the limited quantitative data currently available for Pacific languages.
  • help to identify community needs and inform initiatives to better support the revitalisation, maintenance, and sustainability of Pacific languages in Aotearoa.

The online survey will gather information from Pacific people living in Aotearoa (15 years age and above), about the use of their Pacific languages across multiple domains in Aotearoa, and their attitudes towards their Pacific languages. The survey will be available in both English and nine Pacific languages.

We know that Pacific languages are important to Pacific communities throughout Aotearoa.

Whether you are a young person, a parent, a teacher, a community leader, or perhaps you have lost your language, or maybe you are fluent or are learning your Pacific languages – we encourage you to complete the online survey. We want to hear your story.

We are asking for your input on what we need to do to increase in the use of Pacific languages in Aotearoa, and support the revitalisation, maintenance, and sustainability of Pacific languages in Aotearoa. Your input will help us to provide advice to Government on what is needed to ensure our Pacific languages thrive in Aotearoa.

Get in touch with the Ministry for Pacific Peoples at [email protected]

This research is anonymous. This means that nobody, including the researchers will be aware of your identity. You will be asked to give your consent online before proceeding with the survey, and by answering the survey questions, you are giving consent for us to use your responses in this research.

Your answers will remain completely anonymous and unidentifiable. Once you submit the survey, it will be impossible to retract your answer. Please do not include any personal identifiable information in your responses.

Only the researchers will have access to the data and all data will be destroyed in 10 years’ time.