Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs

As you can see, the Ministry is changing its visual identity to reflect the new and changing story of Pacific New Zealand. Our new website will be coming in 2016, so please bear with us until then. Click here to read more about our new brand.

Welcome to the Ministry for Pacific Peoples

Our vision is Successful Pacific Peoples. Our mission is to effect positive change for Pacific Peoples.


  • Welcome to the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

    The Ministry is changing its visual identity to reflect the new and changing story of Pacific New Zealand.

    The Pacific population of New Zealand is changing and its narrative is becoming less about migration and more about having a firm place in New Zealand. The story of Pacific peoples in New Zealand is also increasingly about our young people and their place here in New Zealand.

    We are proud that as a part of our evolving New Zealand story the Ministry has a new name and a new Māori name. We are now the Ministry for Pacific Peoples – Te Manatū mō Ngā Iwi o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa. This name captures the people we work for and shows we are focused on people.

    Read more about the Design Approach
  • The Design Approach

    The Ministry has taken an alternative approach to work with design Pacific students at Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT).

    This approach has the benefit of providing real-world experience for two young Pacific students heading into the job market while ensuring that the perspectives of Pacific youth are included in the design. Highly collaborative, the partnership has created shared value for both the students and the Ministry.

    Read more about the Designers
  • The Designers

    The two MIT Pacific design students are Nofoagaoalii (Nofo) Me and Daisy Tavilione both from South Auckland.

    Nofo was born and raised in Samoa. She arrived in New Zealand as a 10 year old and her family settled in South Auckland.

    Daisy is a New Zealand born Niuean raised in Manurewa, South Auckland.

    Both these stories capture Pacific New Zealand in its richness. We have a young family arriving and settling in New Zealand and another who represents New Zealand born Pacific.

    Nofoagaoalii Me

    I was born and raised in Samoa. It’s been 10 years since I’ve moved to New Zealand. I am a visual artist, recently completed my final year studying Bachelor of Creative Arts (Visual Arts) at the Faculty of Creative Arts, Manukau Institute of Technology, Otara. My main focus sits around typography and creating original typeface designs - typeface designs utilising island patterns that are contemporary and express my Samoan identity.

    Daisy Tavilione

    I am a New Zealand born Niuean, who works primarily in print and digital design. Born in 1993, I was raised in Manurewa, South Auckland and am now where I am proud to call home. I have completed my final year at the Manukau Institute of Technology completing a Bachelor of Creative Arts (Visual Arts). Recent shows where my works have been exhibited include ‘PIMPI Winter Series – U Can’t Touch This’ and ‘You’re Local’. My works often showcase the influence of the hip hop culture – old school, present and future – and fusing it with significant aspects in my life.

    Read more about the Story
  • The Story around the Design Itself

    There are two main parts to the visual identity – the manu imagery and the Ministry’s name.

    Imagery

    The use of the three manu designs represents a number of things. There is a sense of travel, which is inclusive of the migration history, but also encompasses life’s journey and a feeling of advancement. The concept of flight carries with it a message of direction, freedom and success. This is consistent with our vision of Successful Pacific Peoples and encapsulates what we wish to achieve for our people, our communities and our Ministry.

    The manu design can also be viewed as waves and ripples on the surface of the water, both of which are Pacific in feeling and speak to the impact we wish to have.

    Name and Typography

    The emphasis has been deliberately placed on Pacific Peoples in the name and the typography includes stylised rope lashings. The underlying message is one of togetherness expressed through a contemporary take on a Pacific design.

    Colour

    The design can accommodate a range of colours. As a result, it will have a chameleon-like flexibility – where we can use different colours for different purposes e.g. red for Tongan Language Week. However, we will have a principal colour and we have settled on a fresh, contemporary green that carries the sense of energy, life and growth that we want to express.

    Read more about Questions and Answers
  • Questions & Answers

    The facts behind our new look

    The Ministry used an alternative approach to develop the new visual identity, working with design students rather than a design agency. This means that we gave the students real-world experiences and advances them in their careers, in line with the Ministry’s vision of more successful Pacific peoples. This also meant the Ministry could minimise costs and still get a quality outcome.

    The Ministry’s Māori name reflects the strengthening of ties with Tangata Whenua.

    Below is a breakdown of the visual identity costs, which includes the new Māori name:

    What Notes Cost
    Contractor for Te Reo translation Development of Te Reo translation for the Ministry for Pacific Peoples $2,000
    Designer 1 Payment for logo work $1,500
    Designer 2 Payment for logo work $1,500
    Manukau Institute of Technology Recognition and payment in-kind for providing mentoring for students during the process $1,000
    Signage Yet to be identified due to a number of property movements in all three sites. The Ministry currently does not have any naming rights on all three sites. Signage replacement costs will be met as part of the Property work and will be kept to a minimal -
    $6,000

    Things you may need to know

    Are there other costs associated with the new visual identity?

    Property movements next year means there are no immediate signage costs. However, these will be confirmed in the new year.

    The visual identity cost of these property movements will be kept to a minimum.

    All stationery and business cards will be updated as necessary.

    Why did the Ministry’s visual identity have to change?

    The Pacific population of New Zealand is changing and its narrative is becoming less about migration and more about having a firm place in New Zealand. The story of Pacific peoples in New Zealand is also increasingly about our young people and their place here in New Zealand.

    That is why we wanted to change from using the vaka, which we have been using since 1987, to a more relevant image. You can find the story behind our new visual identity on the front page of our website.

    Why did the Ministry need a Māori name?

    It is standard practice for Government agencies to have a Māori name.

    The Ministry recognised the ties the Pacific community has with Iwi and wanted to ensure we continue to strengthen those ties for all our Pacific New Zealanders.

    Why did the Ministry choose to work with students instead of a design agency?

    In line with the Ministry’s vision of more Successful Pacific Peoples, working with Pacific design students meant the Ministry was giving Pacific youth experience to kick start their careers.

    Choosing this approach also meant the Ministry could minimise costs and still get a quality outcome.

    Read Fetu Pasifika
  • Fetu Pasifika (E News)

    Merry Christmas from the team at the Ministry for Pacific Peoples

    Christmas greetings from the Chief Executive

    Talofa,

    Welcome to the last Fetu Pasifika for 2015. This has been a great year for the advancement of Pacific peoples and it’s ending on a high for the Ministry with the Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards and the launch of a new name and visual identity to better reflect the communities we work with.

    From here forward the Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs will now be the Ministry for Pacific Peoples or MPP for short.

    We’ve changed the logo and other visual identity to reflect both the name and the new and changing story of Pacific New Zealand.

    This story is now not exclusively about migration but also about having a firm sense of belonging in New Zealand, with many children now being born here.

    You’ll see below the story the logo tells and how it reflects the people we now serve.

    I hope Pacific communities in New Zealand will feel a deeper connection with our new visual identity and name.

    The Ministry also now has a Māori name, strengthening ties with Tangata Whenua, with whom many Pacific people already have strong connections.

    We decided to work with Pacific students to develop the new visual identity. This gave the students real-world experience and helps them in their careers, as well as ensuring the voice of Pacific young people is reflected in the Ministry’s new look.

    The bonus of working without an agency was that the Ministry could save costs and still get a quality outcome.

    I look forward to working with you under the new name and logo in 2016.

    In the meantime I hope you all have a well-deserved rest and time with aiga over the holidays.

    Ia Manuia,
    Pauline A Winter


    The new visual identity for the Ministry

    The Story

    The new visual identity tells a story about Pacific people in New Zealand.

    The three manu (birds) in the design represent a sense of travel, which reflects the migration history of Pacific people but also encompass life’s journey and a feeling of advancement.

    The concept of flight carries a message of direction, freedom and success. This is consistent with our vision of Successful Pacific Peoples and expresses what we wish to achieve for our Pacific people, communities and Ministry.

    The manu design can also be viewed as waves and ripples on the surface of the water, which are Pacific in feeling and reflect the impact we wish to have.

    The design of the name in the visual identity also tells a story. The emphasis has been deliberately placed on Pacific Peoples in the name and the typography includes stylised rope lashings. The underlying message is one of togetherness, expressed through a contemporary take on a Pacific design.


    Left: Daisy Tavilione, Right: Nofoagaoalii (Nofo) Me

    The designers in action at a presentation to the Ministry’s Executive Leadership Team.

    Talented Pacific designers create new visual identity

    Two talented Pacific graphic design students are the stars behind the Ministry’s new visual identity.

    The Ministry decided to work with Auckland based Manukau Institute of Technology students Nofoagaoalii (Nofo) Me and Daisy Tavilione and we love the result.

    The project gave the young designers real-world experience to help them springboard their careers and ensured Pacific young people could identify with the new design.

    Nofoagaoalii Me was born and raised in Samoa and moved to New Zealand about a decade ago. She is a talented visual artist whose main focus is typography and creating original typeface designs utilising island patterns that are contemporary and express her Samoan identity.

    Daisy Tavilione is a New Zealand born Niuean, who works primarily in print and digital design. She was raised and lives in Manurewa, South Auckland.

    She says her work often showcases the influence of the hip hop culture – old school, present and future – and fusing it with significant aspects in her life.

    Daisy says working on the new visual identity has been exciting and overwhelming.

    “It’s refreshing to have imagery for a Pacific organisation that isn’t using cliché Pacific images like a palm tree.

    I hope Pacific people can relate to the logo in their own lives and how it carries a message of direction,” she says.

    Both designers have recently finished the final year of a Bachelor of Creative Arts (Visual Arts) so creating the new visual identity was a great project to start their professional lives with.


    The Ministry Leadership consulting on the new visual identity, which proudly features the new Māori name.

    Te Manatū mō Ngā Iwi o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa

    The Ministry now has a Māori name, Te Manatū mō Ngā Iwi o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa. The new name strengthens ties with Tangata Whenua.

    Researching and getting a Māori translation for the name was an important part of the new identity for the Ministry.

    We worked with Te Taura Whiri (the Māori Language Commission) to draft a Te Reo translation of the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.

    The name was then taken to Iwi who have had historic dealings with Pacific migrants, Ngati Whatua and Waikato-Tainui.

    Leaders from both Iwi gave our researcher a narrative of historic dealings with Pacific peoples.

    Ngati Whatua leader, Grant Pakihana Hawke, told us the Iwi welcomes the further strengthening of the Māori and Pacific relationships because “things become better for their youth and for our youth.”

    Tukoroirangi Morgan of Waikato-Tainui says he welcomes the translation.

    “It acknowledges Pacific Nations as a distinct iwi, both genealogically in the Pacific and as the springboard and basis of a family of iwi.

    “No one member is more important than others as we are all connected. The iwi brand makes us a part of a wider brand. Our Waikato Elders have always stated that we are undeniably Pacific and that is our origin: a family of iwi from the Pacific,” he says.


    Kailah Saupese with Greg Hanlen from the Ministry at the Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards at Parliament.

    Māori and Pacific connections at the Ministry

    There are already strong links between Pacific and Māori peoples and this is personified at the Ministry where there are several staff members who have both Māori and Pacific heritage.

    Kailah Saupese from the Ministry’s Human Resources team is half Samoan and half Māori. She says she is lucky and fortunate enough to belong to two iwi – Ngati Whatua ki Orakei and Ngati Kahu.

    She says she thinks there is definitely a connection between Māori and Pacific peoples.

    “Pacific Peoples are proud of their heritage and culture and so are Māori Peoples and in my experiences they both embrace each other’s,” she says.

    Kailah says it’s fantastic the Ministry now has a Māori name as it shows the close connection between Māori and Pacific and our respect towards each other.

    “I did notice that other Ministries had a Māori name and we didn’t and thought it was odd but now we have both a new name and a Māori name – win/win,” she says.

    Kailah says as a Samoan/Māori she has never felt that one culture was superior to the other and has always said she has the best of both worlds.

    “Now that I work for the Ministry, who always acknowledges tangata whenua and now has a Māori name, not only do I feel I have the best of both worlds in a personal sense but now I have it in a professional sense too! I love it!”


    The winners of the 2015 PMPYA with Chief Executive, Pauline Winter.

    Pacific Talent shines at Awards

    The achievements of five of the country’s most talented young Pacific people were recognised at the Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards (PMPYA) at Parliament this month

    The Ministry runs the Awards to celebrate high-achieving young Pacific New Zealanders, help them on their path to success and provide inspiration and role models for other young Pacific people.

    The Awards encourage success for young Pasifika in the arts, business, sport, leadership, and, for the first time, science.

    The winners were whittled down from more than 150 entries from around the Country.

    The support of sponsors has allowed prizes to around the value of $10,000 each for each winner to help them pursue their passions and careers.

    Members of New Zealand's Pacific community, dignitaries, business people, the Pacific Peoples Minister, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga and the Prime Minister, John Key, gathered at the grand hall of parliament to celebrate.

    You can read more about the winners in their profiles below.


    Leorida Peters receives her Award from the Prime Minister, John Key.

    Leadership and Inspiration - Leorida Peters

    Leorida says she leads by example to empower Pasifika success and contribute to progress for Pasifika people.

    She has a special passion for empowering females to achieve.

    The 17-year-old has already proven her dedication to leading and helping others with her involvement in a number of projects including the Sir Peter Blake Youth Leadership Forum, the United Nations General Assembly Australia, the United Nations Youth Pacific Project Samoa and the UNESCO Education for Sustainable Development Conference. She has also shone as the Auckland Girl’s Grammar School 2015 Deputy Head Girl and leader of the school’s Polyfest Samoan Group.

    She is passionate about humanitarian and global issues and has used her leadership roles as an educational platform to inform her Pasifika peers of global issues and to encourage them to be proactive to make a difference.

    Leorida says her faith and the support of her mother are her guiding forces. She says as an only child raised by her Samoan mother, with the support of her grandmother, she learnt the importance of her identity, her language, values of her loving family and that education was critical to success.

    Leorida says her experiences have sparked the justice and freedom fighter within and has inspired her aspiration to study Law and Arts majoring in Politics and International Relations and Pacific Studies.

    She is confident these studies will assist her in her ultimate goal of working in foreign policy or diplomatic service.

    Leorida will be heading to New York to see New Zealand on the Security Council, thanks to support form Air New Zealand and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.


    Jarimar Schuster is a budding rugby star

    Sports and Fitness - Jarimar Schuster

    Jarimar is already a recognisable face around many rugby fields in the Wellington region, he’s been playing rugby since he could walk and dreams of performing at the highest level as an All Black.

    Jarimar’s carving out a promising rugby career which started at St Patricks College before moving to Scots College last year. He says playing his old school in the finals in 2015 and winning for Scots College was personally hard for him to deal with however in the professional era something he knows he will have to get used to.

    He also broke his leg in that final and being unable to play for three months was challenging.

    Despite this, Jarimar went on to receive the prestigious Rugby Colours award for Scots college this year and is also showing his all-round sporting ability by coaching a rugby holiday programme for 7 – 10 year olds.

    He says contributing to the game as a player in every aspect is important to keeping skills on point on and off the field. He has already represented his school teams in Japan and Malaysia and says learning to be a better public speaker is a must for professional athletes. Jarimar says this award will allow him to focus fully on rugby and plans to pursue his dream of becoming an All Black with plans to go to Police Training School in the next five years.

    He is extremely passionate and excited about his next step in life after successfully gaining entry into the New Zealand Institute of Sport where he will be studying the pre-police proficiency programme.

    "I believe I can make a real difference and contribution to the communities I serve,” Jarimar says.

    Jarimar’s prize is a scholarship worth $6000 for one year of tuition fees and course related costs at the New Zealand Institute of Sport, which sponsors the Awards.


    Grace Ligairi has big plans for her business

    Business & Enterprise - Grace Ligairi

    Grace has proven her business acumen and innovation by creating a product she says will revolutionise the hospitality industry.

    Like all good entrepreneurs she saw a problem and found a solution to solve it with a product that is now in prototype stage.

    She says her Slyd’InHolder Tray idea came from working as a waitress and many in the hospitality industry are already in support of her product. She says she’s already been asked to hurry up her development process so it can go to market.

    “I have a comprehensive business plan, a perfected prototype and interest in the product domestically and internationally. The sooner it comes the better is what I’m hearing.” She plans to change the way the hospitality industry operates by offering innovative ways to do things better.

    Grace says her Fijian upbringing has meant humility is a big part of who she is and how she operates. “I have dreamed of revolutionising the hospitality and tourism industry in my home country of Fiji, to create better, faster, easier and practical service,” she says.

    She is living in Whangarei and splits her time when she’s not working on her product between working for a local restaurant and a recruitment agency.

    Grace wins $10,000 to invest in business growth and development thanks to sponsors the Pacific Business Trust and the Ministry for Pacific Peoples.


    Sione Faletau’s Tongan heritage is a big influence in his performance art

    Arts and Creativity - Sione Faletau

    Sione is an accomplished and exhibited artist.

    He says his creative performance art works encompasses and details his identity as a young New Zealand born Tongan and the struggles of a bi-cultural life.

    This talented young artist has a Bachelor in Fine Arts Honours (First Class) and a Master of Fine Arts (First Class honours) from the University of Auckland’s prestigious Elam School of Fine Arts.

    He has exhibited at various art galleries around Auckland and his exhibitions this year include Ha’amonga, curated by Ane Tonga. He will be exhibiting in Christchurch and Melbourne in 2016.

    Sione says the challenges for a young New Zealand born Tongan from Otara in South Auckland are many and hopes his creative work helps others confront and conquer their struggles too.

    He is currently working at the Auckland Museum and plans to start his Doctorate in Fine Arts at the University of Auckland in 2016. His research will focus on Pacific men in New Zealand, in particular Tongan men.

    Sione says his study will help him towards achieving his future aspiration of becoming a lecturer.

    He wins $10,000 to fund a paid internship or residency with a New Zealand arts organisation thanks to sponsor Creative New Zealand.


    Antony Vavia wins the first ever PMPYA STEM Award

    Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) - Antony Vavia

    Antony says such is his determination to succeed in science that he’s already referring to himself as a “Hero Marine Biologist.”

    He says the ocean has barely been explored and he believes many of the solutions that can help Pacific and global communities deal with the world’s depleting resources may lie in the ocean. Antony says the Pacific Ocean is a playground for aquatic life and scientific research and knowledge can provide many economic benefits for Pacific communities.

    His Cook Islands and Fijian heritage ensure his love of the ocean and his drive to succeed. He says his family are a constant source of encouragement and his mother is always reminding him to believe in himself. Antony grew up in South Auckland, was a prefect at Onehunga High School and also a peer sexuality support programme leader. He says being a Pacific teenager can present many challenges however with guidance and support anyone can overcome adversity.

    Antony’s excellence has already been acknowledged with winning a first year Marine Biology Scholarship at AUT in 2014 and plans to continue studying Marine Biology at AUT, where he is often called upon to present a student’s perspective on behalf of the school of Applied Sciences.

    He will get $10,000 total cash to fund learning and development opportunities thanks to sponsors Youthline, Ako Aotearoa and the University of Waikato.


    Read Civil Defence
  • Civil Defence

    Call Civil Defence on 0800 22 22 00 for information and advice, before during, and after an emergency.

    Read Social Media
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    Read Contact Information
  • Contact

    Ministry for Pacific Peoples

    Level 2, ASB Building, 101-103 The Terrace

    WELLINGTON 6011

    P O BOX 833, WELLINGTON 6140

    Telephone: 04 473 4493

    Fax: 04 473 4301

    Email: contact@mpp.govt.nz

  • Minister for Pacific Peoples, Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga, with Ministry Chief Executive, Pauline Winter, and the Prime Minister, Rt Hon John Key, at the 2015 Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards.

  • 2015 Prime Minister’s Pacific Youth Awards winners. (L-R) Antony Vavia, Chief Executive for Ministry for Pacific Peoples, Pauline Winter, Leorida Peters, Grace Ligairi, Jarimar Schuster and Sione Faletau

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